Archive for December, 2011

Frames, Nixon and Summer

Posted in Lectures and Responses on December 8, 2011 by moetdigitalphotography

By Nicholas Nixon

In class we spoke about different ways in which we frame our photographs. I especially liked this photo (above) by Nicholas Nixon of his wife, Beverly Brown (Bebe) and his child. The photo is very simple and focuses on minute details making it even more intimate and special. You can imagine the proud mother smiling down on her newborn cradled in her arms. This is how we would usually see such an image with both subjects in full frame. However, Nixon has focused on the outskirts of the frame, and the small details thus capturing a beautiful image, a smile and the babies’ hand.

I than went onto to look at some of Nixon’s other work. “The Brown Sisters” is a series in which since 1975  to the present day Nixon has took a photograph of his wife and her three sisters every year. Using a large eight-by-ten-inch view camera positioned at eye level, he photographs the women in the same order from left to right: Heather, Mimi, Bebe, and Laurie. Although he makes multiple exposures, Nixon selects only one photograph to represent the women each year. I personally love this series. Nixon has created a compelling investigation of portraiture and the changes through time. It shows the gradual ageing of the women, changes in fashion and location and maybe even their changing relationships with one another. Below are some examples.

"The Brown Sisters" Heather, Mimi, Bebe and Laurie, 1975

"The Brown Sisters" 1985

"The Brown Sisters" 1995

"The Brown Sisters" 2005

"The Brown Sisters" 2010

As you look through the selection of photographs it’s quite clear which of the four women is Nixon’s wife. Bebe seems more relaxed and smiley compared to her sisters who seem more tense and wary of the camera. This made me think of how you can capture a feeling or a relationship someone has or a person’s presence without actually having to include the person in the photo.

I than took some photos of one my nieces and brother. In the photos I like how my niece (Summer) and my brothers facial expressions are the same, or the direction in which their eyes are looking are the same. I made Summer my focal point but kept parts of my brother in the frame. I think this insinuates the bond they have, a father and daughter relationship.

Summer, 2011

Summer, 2011

Summer, 2011

Halloween 2011

Posted in Lectures and Responses on December 5, 2011 by moetdigitalphotography

After looking at both Martin Parr and Peter Dench’s work, I was inspired to emulate their style and focus on British culture. Although, I don’t really like their style of photography I thought it would be interesting to experiment with. I love working in black and white so it would be a chance to expand my photographic work.

Halloween is a big part of western culture and for us Brits it is a chance for us to go out in fancy dress and to get tipsy/drunk to numb the pain of being seen out in a dress…just me? No but really, it is tradition to go out in fancy dress, so I took some photos on Halloween. I tried to enhance the colours in my photos to make them seem garish like Dench or Parrs’ works but didn’t want to change anything else. I experimented in how I framed my photos e.g. long shots, close ups…

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

Halloween 2011

It’s A Brit Thing

Posted in Lectures and Responses on December 5, 2011 by moetdigitalphotography

Martin Parr captures the quirkiness of day-to-day life in Britain. With his interest in “ordinary people doing ordinary things” he manages to extract the extraordinary from the seemingly everyday. Parr focuses on British culture, which is exaggerated through garish colours and unusual perspectives. The bright colours and somewhat exaggerated scenarios make the imagery very entertaining yet quite sickening. It’s like Parr is making fun of British culture but at the same time showing how us British live and what we value. I love how his photographs make a laugh at us whilst showing the truth about national characteristics. Parr highlights the comedic side of British traditions and heritage such as fish and chips, bakeries, drinking and the British seaside.

I looked at Martin Parr’s “The Last Resort” series which records the “great British seaside” in all it’s garish glory. Taken at the height of the Thatcher years “The Last Resort” is famously controversial. I found the photos to be particularly humorous and honest about British culture.

The Last Resort, Brighton, 1985

I found this photo very entertaining. It seems to be a very British thing to run to the beach, towel and suncream in hand,  as soon as there’s a glimmer of hope for sunshine. We all try to squeeze into our tiny yet always overcrowded beaches all in hope to catch some rays.

The Last Resort, Brighton, 1985

Again I find this photo very funny and it’s all down to the way Parr has framed the shot. In reality, this child is probably well looked after and spoiled by it’s guardians/parents but thanks to this photo it looks like wherever the child’s guardian actually is, their more interested in the gamblers. Unaware the child is blissfully wondering around, entertaining itself. Good ol’ british parenting eh?

I than went onto look at Peter Dench. Similarly to Martin Parr, Peter Dench also photographs British culture, using garish colours and equally garish subject matters such as binge drinking and teenage love. I looked at DrinkUk which shows us Brits in all our drunken grandeur!

DrinkUk

DrinkUk

Exposure and Manual Settings

Posted in Lectures and Responses on December 3, 2011 by moetdigitalphotography

EXPOSURE-HOW MUCH LIGHT THERE IS

Brightness depends on:

SHUTTER SPEED-A high shutter speed e.g 500=less exposure

-A lower shutter speed e.g 1=more exposure

APERTURE-The aperture stop of a photographic lens can be adjusted to control the amount of light

reaching the film or image. It also determines where the detail will be in the image.

-The aperture are the F stops on the camera lens

-A high F stop e.g 22=less exposure and more detail

-A low F stop e.g 4=more exposure and less detail (blurred  background, focused foreground)

ISO– Film speed e.g 100 or 400 is the measure of photographic film’s sensitivity to light.

DEPTH OF FIELD

DOF is the distance between the nearest and farthest objects in a scene that can be exceptionally sharp (in focus) or out of focus. For example, F4 would mean the foreground or object would be in focus and the background would be out of focus. Whilst F22 would mean everything would be in focus.

Below are some examples of different manual settings I used to create some self portraits.

F4 Shutter Speed 8

F4 Shutter Speed 8

F4 Shutter Speed 60

F4 Shutter Speed 125

F22 Shutter Speed 2

F22 Shutter Speed 125